5 Amazing Things We’ve Learned a Year After Visiting Pluto

5 Amazing Things We’ve Learned a Year After Visiting Pluto

On July 14, 2015, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft swept up close to Pluto, giving us our first close look at the tiny icy world since its discovery in 1930.
It took all of three minutes for the spacecraft to cross the dwarf planet’s heart-stained face, but it spent much longer sailing through the entire system and staring at Pluto, its huge moon Charon, and the four small moons Styx, Nix, Hydra, and Kerberos.
The data it gathered during that fleeting encounter continue to surprise and mystify scientists, just as Pluto continues to be as much a public favorite as it ever was, even inspiring the U.S. Postal Service to issue a stamp revising its 1991 “Pluto—Not Yet Explored” release.
“There's something about the underdog Pluto that inspires and interests people, more than I've seen for any of the targets I've worked on,” says New Horizons team member Carly Howett of the Southwest Research Institute in Colorado.
Read More: National Geographic
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