Researchers design a solar-powered desalination device for rural India

Posted by K R on

The air was hot and gritty. Shehazvi had to squint to see past the sun into the edge of town, past the cars and motorcycles whizzing by, past the scorched earth, to where old buildings stood beautiful in their own way, muted pinks and oranges still curving and curling in all the right places. No rain again today.
She and her daughter climbed out of the rickshaw and walked down the alley that leads to their home, 200 rupees lighter than when they left for Jalgaon city earlier that day. That's how much it cost every time she took her daughter to the doctor for stomach pains. The culprit? The salty drinking water. "Excessive salt intake can be quite detrimental to one's health, both in the short and long term," says Maulik D. Majmudar, a cardiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital. But there is no grocery store in Shehazvi's rural Indian village where she can stock up on bottled water. There is no on-demand tap of drinking water that's already been prepared for her safety and comfort. There is no reliable electricity. Read More: Phys.org

Share this post



← Older Post Newer Post →


0 comments

Leave a comment