Secret to Great Pyramid's near perfect alignment possibly found

Posted by K R on

Though slightly lopsided, the towering, Great Pyramid of Giza is an ancient feat of engineering, and now an archaeologist has figured out how the Egyptians may have aligned the monument almost perfectly along the cardinal points, north-south-east-west — they may have used the fall equinox. The fall equinox occurs halfway between the summer and winter solstices, when Earth's tilt is such that the length of the day and nightare almost the same. About 4,500 years ago, Egyptian pharaoh Khufu had the Great Pyramid of Giza constructed; it is the largest of the three pyramids — now standing about 455 feet (138 meters) tall — on the Giza Plateau and was considered a "wonder of the world" by ancient writers. Turns out, the pyramid builders somehow designed this ancient wonder with extreme precision. "The builders of the Great Pyramid of Khufu aligned the great monument to the cardinal points with an accuracy of better than four minutes of arc, or one-fifteenth of one degree," wrote Glen Dash, an engineer who studies the Giza pyramids, in a paper published recently in the Journal of Ancient Egyptian Architecture. The pyramid of Khafre (also located at Giza) and the Red Pyramid (located at the site of Dahshur) are also aligned with a high degree of accuracy, Dash noted. "All three pyramids exhibit the same manner of error; they are rotated slightly counterclockwise from the cardinal points," Dash wrote. For over a century, researchers have proposed different methods used by the ancient Egyptians to align the pyramids along these cardinal points with such accuracy. In his paper, Dash demonstrates how a method that makes use of the fall equinox could have been used.

Read More: Fox News


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