Midnight In The Desert — atoms

Electricity generated with water, salt and a 3-atoms-thick membrane

Posted by K R on

Electricity generated with water, salt and a 3-atoms-thick membrane

Proponents of clean energy will soon have a new source to add to their existing array of solar, wind, and hydropower: osmotic power. Or more specifically, energy generated by a natural phenomenon occurring when fresh water comes into contact with seawater through a membrane. Researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Nanoscale Biology have developed an osmotic power generation system that delivers never-before-seen yields. Their innovation lies in a three atoms thick membrane used to separate the two fluids. The results of their research have been published in Nature. The concept is fairly simple. A semipermeable membrane separates two fluids with different...

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Next Higgs? Atom smasher probes highest energies yet

Posted by K R on

Next Higgs? Atom smasher probes highest energies yet

Scientists at the world's largest atom smasher have made a precise tally of the jumbled cascade of particles produced when two proton beams are smashed together. The results could help researchers discover new types of particles, akin to the now-famous Higgs boson. Researchers at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Switzerland sent two beams of protons hurtling in opposite directions and crashed them together at the highest energy level yet achieved at the LHC. The research is part of the CMS experiment, which stands for Compact MuonSolenoid. For each of the 150,000 proton-proton collisions the researchers identified, about 22 charged...

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Scientists Have Recorded the Sound of a Single Atom

Posted by K R on

Scientists Have Recorded the Sound of a Single Atom

The researchers, from Columbia University and Sweden's Chalmers University of Technology, captured the sound that a single atom makes when it moves by detecting the vibrations emanating from it. Just like you learned at school, vibrations create sound—it's just, in this case, the sound is very, very quiet indeed. So how did they do it? Well, they excited an atom, then detect its acoustic emissions using a specially made chip that converts miniscule acoustic waves into microwaves. Crucially, those microwaves are of large enough amplitude to actually be recorded—using low-temperature microwaving amplifiers—unlike their acoustic counterparts. via Gizmodo.

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