Midnight In The Desert — Category_Earth Changes

Magnets could pull oil out of ocean before wildlife is harmed

Posted by K R on

Magnets could pull oil out of ocean before wildlife is harmed

It’s an attractive idea. Magnets could be used to pull oil from spills out of the water, with the help of iron oxide nanoparticles. The stickiness of oil makes it difficult to remove from marine plants and animals once it is leaked by tankers and offshore rigs, so finding a way to quickly remove spills is essential for protecting ocean environments. Now Yi Du at the University of Wollongong, Australia, and his team have found a way to do this, using tiny particles of iron oxide that bind tightly to droplets of oil. When added to small water tanks polluted...

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Antarctica still losing ice despite big rise in snowfall

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Antarctica still losing ice despite big rise in snowfall

Snowfall in Antarctica has increased by 10 per cent since 1800, an analysis of ice cores from Antarctica has revealed. An increase in snowfall has long been predicted as a result of global warming. “A warming atmosphere is wetter, producing more precipitation,” says team leader Liz Thomas of the British Antarctic Survey, who presented the findings today at a meeting of the European Geosciences Union in Vienna, Austria. In fact, it used to be thought that increased snowfall in the Antarctica would more than counter any ice loss due to warming. Early IPCC reports forecast that the ice sheets of...

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Why This Giant Crack Opened Up In Kenya's Rift Valley

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Why This Giant Crack Opened Up In Kenya's Rift Valley

Mai Mahiu-Narok road, in a region just west of Nairobi, Kenya, used to be fully intact. Then, after a period of heavy rainfall late last month, a massive crack was exposed. According to the local news outlet, Daily Nation, it measures 50 feet deep and 65 feet wide in some spots. Geologist David Adede, who spoke with the paper, said the crack was likely filled previously with volcanic ash from nearby Mt. Longonot. This means the space was only exposed when rainwater washed the ash away. Reuters reports that the opening formed rapidly. One resident named Eliud Njoroge Mbugua saw...

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Your old computer could be a better source of metals than a mine

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Your old computer could be a better source of metals than a mine

From your water-logged phone to your smashed smart TV, those personal electronics headed for the landfill are a potential goldmine. Or copper mine. Or—some day—a lithium mine. Economists already knew that along with the swelling 44.7 million metric tons of electronic waste tossed each year we were throwing out billions of dollars in resources. But quantifying all the gold, copper, iron, plastic, and rare earths languishing in our landfills and recycling centers is only part of the problem. Figuring out whether it’s worthwhile, financially speaking, to sift those resources out of the rubble—instead of continuing to extract them from traditional...

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2018 Hurricane Season May Be Busier Than Normal

Posted by K R on

2018 Hurricane Season May Be Busier Than Normal

It may seem like we just said goodbye to Harvey, Irma, and Maria, but the new hurricane season is near its official start of June 1. With that, Colorado State University is out with its annual Atlantic forecast, and the season looks to be a little busier than usual, reports the Weather Channel: 3 big ones: The forecast calls for 14 named storms, seven hurricanes, and three major hurricanes among those seven. All are above the 30-year average of 12 named storms, six hurricanes, and two major hurricanes. Last year: We ended up with 17 named storms, 10 hurricanes, and...

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