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Space Oddity by Commander Chris Hadfield

Space Oddity by Commander Chris Hadfield

A revised version of David Bowie's Space Oddity, recorded by Commander Chris Hadfield on board the International Space Station. (Note: This video cannot be reproduced and is licensed for online music use only.) With thanks to Emm Gryner, Joe Corcoran, Andrew Tidby and Evan Hadfield for all their hard work. Captioning kindly provided by CHS (www.chs.ca) Find out more: Twitter: twitter.com/Cmdr_Hadfield Facebook: www.facebook.com/AstronautChrisHadfield?­­fref=ts Google+: plus.google.com/113978637743265603454/po­­sts/p/pub


Research Suggests We Could Recognize and Appreciate Alien Music

Research Suggests We Could Recognize and Appreciate Alien Music

When we think about the reality of meeting an extraterrestrial race, we often think about the difficulty, and sometimes supposed impossibility, of communicating or even recognizing that communication was being attempted. We wonder, also, how we could recognize a culture completely outside of our frames of reference. Could we even identify alien artwork, let alone appreciate it? Could we recognize alien music, if they indeed had a concept of music? A paper published in the journal Scientific Reports suggests that humans would be able to recognize and appreciate alien music due to our ability to process language, provided that it...


'2001 A Space Odyssey' 50 Years On: Q&A with Computer Scientist Stephen Wolfram

'2001 A Space Odyssey' 50 Years On: Q&A with Computer Scientist Stephen Wolfram

In April 1968, Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke released "2001: A Space Odyssey." The film has delighted and confounded audiences for 50 years now, and presaged many technological and cultural developments, from computers and AI to space exploration and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Computer scientist Stephen Wolfram, inventor of the computation software Mathematica and online Wolfram Alpha knowledge engine, spoke with Space.com about the impact the movie had on developing technologies of the day as well as where its predictions haven't come to fruition. Space.com: Where does "2001" fit in the cannon of predictive science-fiction stories? Stephen Wolfram:...


Chinese Space Station Tiangong 1 Falls to Earth

Chinese Space Station Tiangong 1 Falls to Earth

China’s prototype space station, whose name translates as “Heavenly Palace 1,” met a fiery end in Earth’s atmosphere Sunday (April 1), breaking apart and burning up in the skies over the southern Pacific Ocean at about 8:16 p.m. EDT (0016 April 2 GMT), according to the U.S. Strategic Command’s Joint Force Space Component Command (JFSCC). “The JFSCC used the Space Surveillance Network sensors and their orbital analysis system to confirm Tiangong-1’s re-entry,” U.S. Air Force officials wrote in a statement. Some pieces of the school-bus-size Tiangong-1 almost certainly survived the fall, but the odds that they caused any damage or...