Midnight In The Desert — infrastructure

The Project To Monitor Bridges and Infrastructure From Space Is Growing 

Posted by K R on

The Project To Monitor Bridges and Infrastructure From Space Is Growing 

A few months ago, the European Space Agency and the University of Nottingham described a new project that would use satellites to monitor aging, at-risk piece of infrastructure was at a given moment, right down to the centimeter. Now, more countries want in. Today Global Construction Review reports that the ESA project is in the process of securing a cash infusion to the tune of $650,000 from a new source: The China Railway Group, which is interested in using the technology to monitor the health of its bridges from space. China has seen an explosion of new bridge and infrastructure...

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It's Time to Fix America's Infrastructure. Here's Where to Start

Posted by K R on

It's Time to Fix America's Infrastructure. Here's Where to Start

President Obama believes America must build “21st century infrastructure—modern ports, stronger bridges, faster trains and the fastest Internet,” and in his State of the Union this week he asked the Republican-controlled Congress to pass a bipartisan infrastructure plan, likely the trillion-dollar legislation Senator Bernie Sanders proposed earlier this month. It’s an ambitious plan that many agree is desperately needed. The American Society of Civil Engineers says the US needs massive investments in all essential infrastructure, from bridges and airports to dams and railways. According to the society’s most recent infrastructure report card, the US earns a D+ for its infrastructure....

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The Shame of America's Rotting Roads

Posted by K R on

The Shame of America's Rotting Roads

By Barry Ritholtz In the middle of the last century the U.S. started building the Interstate Highway System. It's now named after President Dwight Eisenhower, who shepherded its passage through Congress in 1956. Connecting the far-flung corners of this large nation, this 47,714 mile network allows commerce to flow freely. The cost of construction, adjusted for inflation, was more than $400 billion. By any imaginable measure, it was a wild success, and soon became the envy of the world. The construction and maintenance was paid for mainly through levies on sales of vehicles, tires and related goods, and a federal...

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