Midnight In The Desert — jupiter

'2001 A Space Odyssey' 50 Years On: Q&A with Computer Scientist Stephen Wolfram

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'2001 A Space Odyssey' 50 Years On: Q&A with Computer Scientist Stephen Wolfram

In April 1968, Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke released "2001: A Space Odyssey." The film has delighted and confounded audiences for 50 years now, and presaged many technological and cultural developments, from computers and AI to space exploration and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Computer scientist Stephen Wolfram, inventor of the computation software Mathematica and online Wolfram Alpha knowledge engine, spoke with Space.com about the impact the movie had on developing technologies of the day as well as where its predictions haven't come to fruition. Space.com: Where does "2001" fit in the cannon of predictive science-fiction stories? Stephen Wolfram:...

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Planets Line Up! See Jupiter, Mars, Saturn Together (Mercury and Venus, Too)

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Planets Line Up! See Jupiter, Mars, Saturn Together (Mercury and Venus, Too)

Skywatchers in the Northern Hemisphere can get an eyeful of planets over the next few days, both before dawn and after sunset (provided the clouds of Winter Storm Quinn don't ruin the view). Jupiter, Mars and Saturn will line up in the southeastern portion of the early-morning sky through Saturday (March 10), with the moon crashing the celestial party on these days as well, according to EarthSky.org. The moon will be close to Jupiter on Thursday morning (March 8), then mosey over next to Mars and Saturn on the following two days. Venus and Mercury, meanwhile, will put on an...

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Jupiter's Great Red Spot will evaporate in little more than 10 years

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Jupiter's Great Red Spot will evaporate in little more than 10 years

When it was first measured in the 1800s, Jupiter’s Great Red Spot was an enormous four times bigger than the Earth. Then, when the space probe Voyager 2 hurtled past in 1979, it was seen to be a little more than twice the size of our planet. Now under the prying eye of NASA’s Juno probe, it’s barely 30 per cent bigger than us. “Nothing lasts forever,” Juno mission planetary scientist Glenn Orton told Business Insider. “In truth, the GRS (Great Red Spot) has been shrinking for a long time ... “The GRS will in a decade or two become...

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Jupiter's Great Red Spot Is More Than 50 Times Deeper Than Earth's Ocean

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Jupiter's Great Red Spot Is More Than 50 Times Deeper Than Earth's Ocean

NASA's Juno spacecraft is getting to the roots of Jupiter's famous Great Red Spot. New research, collected during the mission's first pass over the iconic storm, reveals that it extends far beneath the planet's surface. The spacecraft also discovered two newly identified radiation zones. "One of the most basic questions about Jupiter's Great Red Spot is, how deep are the roots?" Juno principal investigator Scott Bolton, of the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, said in a statement. Bolton and his team presented Juno's results at the American Geophysical Union meeting in New Orleans yesterday (Dec. 11). "Juno data indicate...

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NASA’s $1 Billion Jupiter Probe Just Sent Back Stunning New Photos Of Jupiter

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NASA’s $1 Billion Jupiter Probe Just Sent Back Stunning New Photos Of Jupiter

Traveling above Jupiter at more than 130,000 miles per hour, NASA's $1 billion Juno probe took its ninth set of stunning flyby images on October 24. But the sun slipped between the giant planet and Earth for more than a week, blocking the spacecraft from beaming home its precious bounty of data. Now that the conjunction is over, however, new raw image data from Juno's ninth perijove — as the spacecraft's high-speed flybys are called — has poured in. Researchers posted it all online on Tuesday, and a community of amateurs and professionals has been busily processing the data to...

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