Midnight In The Desert — Mexico

Hurricane Drought Hits a New Record

Posted by K R on

Hurricane Drought Hits a New Record

Saturday was a quiet day across the Gulf of Mexico, but not one without note, because a strange record was set: It has been 1,048 days since a hurricane developed in or entered the Gulf. That is the longest streak in the past 130 years, since formal record-keeping began in 1886. The Atlantic hurricane season starts in June and lasts through the end of November. But the last storm in the Gulf was Hurricane Ingrid, which made landfall in northeastern Mexico in September 2013. "You have to have conditions just right for a hurricane to form, and the conditions haven't...

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'At the limit,' Mexico buckles under migrant surge to U.S.

Posted by K R on

'At the limit,' Mexico buckles under migrant surge to U.S.

Mexico is struggling to stem the flow of Central American migrants traveling to the United States ahead of the U.S. presidential election, causing major concern in Washington, which is weighing sending more agents to help. In 2014, Mexico moved to strengthen its southern border when a surge in child migrants from Central America sparked a political crisis in the United States. Last year, Mexico detained over 190,000 migrants, more than double the number in 2012. But official data examined by Reuters shows that fewer migrants have been captured in Mexico this year even as the number caught on the U.S....

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Two More Rivers Disappear Overnight In Mexico

Posted by K R on

Two More Rivers Disappear Overnight In Mexico

Do you have a whitewater rafting trip planned this summer in Mexico? Are you thinking about going tubing down the Tliapa River? Think again. The Tliapa and Tlacuapa rivers have joined the Atoyac River in mysteriously disappearing overnight to someplace other than Veracruz where they used to flow. According to a report in the Latin American Herald Tribune, the Tliapa and Tlacuapa rivers begin in the mountains in central Veracruz in the cities of Chocaman and Calcahualco, approximately 18 km (11 miles apart). The rivers used to flow into the Seco River in the central city of Cordoba. That was...

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