This man is closer than ever to building the world's first time machine

This man is closer than ever to building the world's first time machine

It was a personal tragedy that started the timeline. After Boyd Mallett died of a sudden heart attack in 1955, his 10 year old son, Ronald, made a promise: he would find a way to travel back in time to warn his father of what was going to happen. It was a mission inspired partly by a copy of H.G. Wells' The Time Machine, which Ron discovered a year after his father's passing. The story follows the narrator's journey into the future, but one line in particular struck Ron: "Scientific people know very well that time is just a kind of space and we can move forward and backward in time just as we can in space." He believed that he could build a fully working time machine to go back in time and so he dedicated his future to proving it. "For me the sun rose and set on him," says Mallett about his father, a television repairman who was just 33 when he died. Ron kept his research into time travel a secret for many years for fear he might damage his credibility. Sadly, that prevented him from reaching out to people who might have been able to help him. Now aged 69, Ron Mallett, a physics professor at the University of Connecticut, is totally candid about his research, but he still hasn't reunited with his father and most likely never will. But he has an equation that he believes holds the key to building the first time machine and he might be close to a breakthrough. Read More: TechRadar
Back to blog

Leave a comment